Music to Sing

These choral works are available for performance. Please contact the composer for more information.

Remember Now

The St. Andrews Voice Festival 2015 held a workshop with Voces 8, for which four compositions were selected. Submitting composers had a choice of 4 Scriptural texts. The passages from Jonah and John's Gospel were rejected for being unsuitable for singing. The text of Psalm 93 was rejected because it was missing the final verse. The text of Ecclesiastes 12 was the fourth and the most appropriate choice. The recording on this video was made from the Voces 8 performance during the workshop and is around the second or third time of singing the composition. 

Approximate performance time: 4 minutes, 34 seconds


The Pied Piper of Hamelin

Words by Robert Browning

Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2016

  • Choir (SATB)
  • Children's choir
  • Flute / piccolo
  • Piano
  • Percussion
  • Double bass

Approximate performance time: 17 minutes, 18 seconds


A Tree Call'd Judith

Words and Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2016

Based on an idea for a poem written by William Cowper On Yardley Oak, which described a tree planted in the reign of William the Conqueror. It was nicknamed "Judith" after one of the King's relatives. It famously keeled over during the 18th century, giving rise to the poem.

For choir and renaissance instruments 

Approximate performance time: 5 minutes, 28 seconds


Psalm 53: Where No Fear Was

Words from the Authorised Version of the Psalms

Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2016

For unaccompanied choir

  • Soprano
  • Alto
  • Tenor
  • Bass

Approximate performance time: 3 minutes, 4 seconds


Psalm 83: Do unto them

Words from the Authorised Version of the Psalms

Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2016

For unaccompanied choir

  • Soprano
  • Alto
  • Tenor
  • Bass

Approximate performance time: 4 minutes, 38 seconds


Psalm 56: For God is for me

Words from the Authorised Version of the Psalms

Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2016

For unaccompanied choir

  • Soprano
  • Alto
  • Tenor
  • Bass

Approximate performance time: 4 minutes, 56 seconds


    Psalm 90: A Tale that is Told

    Words from the Authorised Version of the Psalms

    Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2016

    For unaccompanied choir

    • Soprano
    • Alto
    • Tenor
    • Bass

    Approximate performance time: 9 minutes, 31 seconds


    Luke's Gospel: My God and my Lord

    Words from the Authorised Version of Luke's Gospel

    Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2016

    For unaccompanied choir

    • Soprano
    • Alto
    • Tenor
    • Bass

    Approximate performance time: 4 minutes, 50 seconds


    Chester Minstrel's March

    Words and Music by Abigail J. Fox © 2017

    For Male Voice Choir and Piano

    • Tenor
    • Bass 1
    • Bass 2

    Approximate performance time: 4 minutes, 10 seconds

    This work is based on actual historical events. In 1212, Earl Randulf of Chester was taken prisoner by the Welsh in his castle of Rhuddlan in Flintshire. A messenger reached the Constable of Chester, but all the soldiers at Chester Fair were too drunk to move. So the Constable and his son-in-law, Dutton, gathered together all the minstrels and jugglers. Dutton led them into Wales, until they boldly approached Rhuddlan Castle. The Welsh captors were in a position of strength. But they mistook the large group of minstrels for an army and fled the scene. The Earl of Chester was free.

    Dutton and the minstrels were rewarded. All minstrels had to obtain a licence to make music from the King, once a year. But after the events of 1212, every Midsummer’s Day the minstrels of Chester visited the court of the Dutton family instead. Each musician presented four flagons of wine and four-pence half-penny in return for a licence to make music for 12 months. This practice continued until 1756.*

    This composition gives a male voice choir the privilege of stepping into the shoes of those minstrels, with the bravado that comes naturally on a boozy summer’s day but which still does credit to the memory and courage of those men. It should not be sung with affectation. Many of the minstrels were criminals, only allowed into the city on that day because of an amnesty during the Fair. There are no solos because this is a work about strength in numbers. The choir should imagine the minstrel’s marching song as one which begins almost as a joke, but gains sincerity and conviction as they have no choice but to see their mission through. The more sombre reprise without piano accompaniment is a rare sober moment on the homeward journey, before they recall their pride. A robust joy and sense of purpose is as important as precision of pitch. 

    * History taken from The Oxford Companion to Music by Percy A. Scholes: “Minstrels (2) The Minstrel in English History”


    Psalm-Singing

    The performance of choral-settings of the Psalms reflects a level of expertise and investment. For congregational use, the metrical Psalms can be sung to familiar hymn tunes, which very work well with a large body of voices.

    For private use, we may set the Psalms more individually. As an illustration of this, I have made my Psalms of Ascent available to hear online. They are not commercial recordings, but just as I sing them, soft and often. I adopted the practice of private Psalm singing after reading that the Rev. William Romaine did so every day. Such music, with no audience or observer, is music for God alone. When listening to these examples, please think less of the voice and the composition and rather be challenged to sing the Psalms for yourself.